Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy”

Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy” | IntelliRetail.com
In the last two months, Amazon has spotlighted two new products that allow shoppers to add items to their shopping list without ever typing anything into a search bar. This isn’t a coincidence.

The most recent one is Amazon Dash — a thin, wand-like device, revealed on Friday, that includes both a microphone and a barcode scanner. Speak into it or scan a box of cereal or pack of toilet paper to automatically add that product to your AmazonFresh shopping list.
Before Dash, Amazon announced in February that it was adding a technology called Flow to its main shopping app on mobile phones. A user taps on the Flow feature in the app, points the phone at a product in their home — say, a book or a bottle of shampoo — and Flow is supposed to quickly display the product page on the phone’s screen.

Source: Amazon Dash and The Race To Slash The Time Between “Want” and “Buy” | Re/code




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How Retailers should Adapt to Changes in Retail Shopping?

How Retailers should Adapt to Changes in Retail Shopping? | IntelliRetail.com
There has been a considerable change in retail shopping over the last few years. Consumers’ purchasing behavior has changed significantly. So, it is essential for retailers to adapt to these changes and provide their customers with necessary services. This will not only help them to survive the changes, but also compete with others in the business. Internet and smartphones have changed the way people shop. They now have more choices over what they want to buy and from where. Let us see what changes have taken place and how the retailers should deal with them.

Source: How Retailers should Adapt to Changes in Retail Shopping? | Mobile Commerce Blog - SeeMore Interactive


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Could Online Retailers Be Profitable and Grow?

Could Online Retailers Be Profitable and Grow? | IntelliRetail.com
Most online retailers are not profitable yet and the industry estimates are not looking good either. The online retail industry has so far been competing with each other on price and costly customer acquisition, which in combination does not auger well for profitability.

The prevalent belief is that only at scale (aka, a billion dollar or more in revenue) can these retailers believe to be able to amortize their customer acquisition and marketing costs. This belief stems from the assumption that you need to pay (or offer a hefty discount) for people to shop online and to market (aka advertise) heavily to remain in the customer psyche.

Source: Could Online Retailers Be Profitable and Grow? - Business 2 Community




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Amazon to Raise Shipping Fees as Revenue Disappoints

Amazon to Raise Shipping Fees as Revenue Disappoints | IntelliRetail.com
Amazon investors might have finally heard the news they have been waiting for: The retailer is raising shipping fees.

Amazon has 237 million active customers but as a general rule makes almost no profit. Thursday’s announcement that the company was considering raising prices by as much as 50 percent on its $79 Prime shipping program could mean $500 million for its skimpy bottom line.

Source: Amazon to Raise Fees as Revenue Disappoints - NYTimes.com