Future Group's Indus-League plans new retail format

Future Group-owned Indus-League Clothing is diversifying from a western branded apparel company to a speciality retailer. By bundling together a cross section of its in-house brands, Indus-League Clothing intends to make bigger strides in the formal menswear segment with a retail format called Headquarters.

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Ambush Marketing Hits the World Cup

On Tuesday, a group of 36 attractive Dutch women wearing skimpy orange dresses were ejected from a World Cup match in South Africa in an apparent case of "ambush marketing." The women had allegedly gathered in a show of support for Dutch brewer Bavaria, representing a violation of FIFA's agreement with Budweiser, the event's official beer sponsor.

Ambush marketing is when a company not sponsoring an event like the World Cup or the Olympics runs a campaign that links the advertiser to that event in the consumer's mind.
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Getting More Out of Dad's Day (A Postmortem)

Father's Day, described by one newspaper columnist as the "Rodney Dangerfield of Holidays," yesterday turned 100. Having just endured another, retailers and marketers may be wondering this morning what they did wrong. But perhaps it's the fault of the holiday itself.
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Clothes, Gadgets and Gift Cards Prevail as Top Gifts This Father's Day, According to NRF Survey - National Retail Federation
Mom Second Only to Winter Holidays, According to NRF Survey - National Retail Federation
Easy to Please on Father's Day - National Geographic Daily News
Dad, don't expect a lot - Omaha World-Herald
Happy 100th birthday, Father's Day - MSNBC
Rodney Dangerfield of holidays puts dads front and center - Daytona Beach News-Journal
Father's Day Centennial: June 20, 2010 - Census.gov

How the Offer of 'Free Shipping' Affects On-line Shopping

Published in Knowledge@Wharton
The phrase "free shipping" is like a siren song to many who shop on the Internet.
For whatever reason, a free shipping offer that saves a customer $6.99 is more appealing to many than a discount that cuts the purchase price by $10, says Wharton marketing professor David Bell. Bell noticed this phenomenon a few years ago while doing research for an online grocery store, and the observation prompted him to look more closely at the ways Internet retailers use shipping charges -- or the lack thereof -- as a promotional tool.

'Toning' Shoes Gain Traction

Reebok and Skechers are enjoying big market-share gains thanks to supposedly muscle-activating shoes. First-place Nike has scoffed at the claims and paid a price.

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Food Giants Revise Recipes to Please Uncle Sam

From utility companies and Wall Street firms to health insurers and oil producers, Washington is putting big business under intense scrutiny. With obesity a serious public health problem in the U.S., large food companies such as PepsiCo (PEP) and Campbell Soup (CPB) are feeling the pressure, too.

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The Retail Business in Kuwait and the Middle East

Walking around Kuwaiti malls (Avenues in particular), you would see that many multinational retailers are represented in Kuwait. There was huge boom in terms of the number of retailers being represented in Kuwait, a boom that can be mainly attributed to Al Shaya Group. In the past year, we have seen the likes of P.F.Changs, American Eagle, Pottery Barn (soon), Pinkberry, among others arrive in Kuwait. The Kuwaiti consumer has a big appetite and a big spending power, making the Kuwaiti market an attractive one.Walking around Kuwaiti malls (Avenues in particular), you would see that many multinational retailers are represented in Kuwait. There was huge boom in terms of the number of retailers being represented in Kuwait, a boom that can be mainly attributed to Al Shaya Group. In the past year, we have seen the likes of P.F.Changs, American Eagle, Pottery Barn (soon), Pinkberry, among others arrive in Kuwait. The Kuwaiti consumer has a big appetite and a big spending power, making the Kuwaiti market an attractive one.
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Mother Dairy aims to become a retail giant

Mother Dairy, one of the country’s largest milk processors, plans to roll out a chain of exclusive retail outlets, named ‘Gaurav Stores’, to market the entire range of its products across India.

According to company sources, it has planned to launch 350 exclusive stores in New Delhi and 200 retail outlets in Mumbai in the first phase, to be expanded later in all major cities.

The company owns a network of booths in Delhi to market the dairy products. The new concept has been introduced to create a better brand and street visibility, to consolidate its position in the wake of growing competition.

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PepsiCo Gathers Shopper Insights Along the Path to Purchase

The path to purchase is not a straight line, and neither is it a circle as some have described it. It is more like a pool or a “puddle,” says Sonja Mathews, director of strategy and consumer insights, PepsiCo, Purchase, N.Y. “We’ve seen a lot of models that are circular in nature. It almost infers a linear relationship to the path to purchase, but I don’t think it is linear. I think a shopper is really a time traveler.” 

Kraft Leverages Shopper Insights to Develop Ocasion-Based Marketing

For a generation, Americans have been pushing their food-shopping trips closer to when they actually consume their purchases rather than going like clockwork simply to re-stock their shelves. But CPG companies and supermarkets have been slow to figure out how to address this cultural shift in their marketing and merchandising practices.

P&G's Gillette Fusion battles Schick line of razors

Procter & Gamble's Gillette is crossing swords with shaving rival Schick with the official launch of the latest generation of razors and blades, Gillette Fusion ProGlide.

This time, the latest models aren't adding blades - they're holding at five - but have brought the science of shaving technology to bear on making the ritual more comfortable in hopes of encouraging men to shave more often.
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Preliminary Findings from the New 'Omni-Channel' Shopper Study

IBM offers a useful model to explain how consumers shop: they investigate products and services, then select the solution that most fits their needs, then pay for the selected goods and services, and ultimately take possession of the chosen solution. Prior to the widespread consumer adoption of the Internet as an information resource (let’s put that date at 1995, when browser pioneer Netscape IPO’ed), all of those activities usually happened in the store, and usually in one trip. Shoppers would typically walk into a store, take a look around to see what was being promoted or featured, compare the features and prices of what was being offered, make their selections, go through the checkout process, and walk out the door with our new purchases – very simple!



Building a virtual mall

Buoyed by demand from small towns, Home Shop 18, the 24-hour shopping channel from Network 18, is eyeing rapid growth. But the journey so far has been far from smooth

It accounts for 4.5 per cent of all digital cameras sold in the country, and is the largest seller of stainless steel dinner sets. No retailer sells more Reebok merchandise than it. Whirlpool has come out with a new range of refrigerators especially for it. TV 18 Home Shopping Network, a joint venture of Network 18 (51 per cent), South Asia Infrastructure Fund (34 per cent) and GS Homeshopping of South Korea (15 per cent), has covered some distance in the two years that it has been around.

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Lifestyle centers are growing in popularity, but some say malls will win out

Lifestyle centers have been hailed as a replacement for struggling shopping malls, but despite their popularity, retail developers aren't sure the trend is likely to last.
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Private labels shine in retail

Organised retailers are expanding their private label portfolios to push margins.

Private labels are brands owned by the retailers themselves, priced at least 5-20 per cent less than manufactured brands.

According to industry estimates, profit margins in private labels range from 15-20 per cent in FMCG products, 20 per cent in electronic goods and 30-70 per cent in apparels.

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